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Recapping 2019

I had many great horsey experiences in 2019!  I am really pleased with how the year went overall; nothing is ever perfect, but both horses are sound, happy, and healthy, which is really what matters to me.

Some of my 2019 goals were met easily or with lots of hard work, and a few of them were utter fails haha.  C'est la vie! Let's recap!

Happy, health, sound
Both mares are doing well in this regard!  Dreamy will be 29 this year, and while she definitely shows signs of her age at times, she overall looks and acts much younger than she really is!  Ellie has really matured this year, filling out as well as mentally becoming more comfortable in her own skin.  As she will be eight this year, I feel like we have moved through the baby phase.

Continue lessons with Beth and Babette
This goal was met and then some!  I took almost weekly dressage lessons with Beth and monthly jump lessons with Babette. Thanks to the Morgan Dressage Association scholarship, I was also able to attend two clini…

Wait, are those.....COWS?!?!


To make a very long story short, I agreed to go out to dinner with an acquaintance and I cautiously agreed to date him...and the rest, as they say, is history!  LOL!  How's that for catching you all up on my love life hahahaha.

The great part about deciding to be with someone again is that you can be VERY PICKY.  I knew exactly what I wanted in any man I was going to be with from here on out.  High on the list was someone who respected the fact that I enjoy horses and having a farm.

One of the factors that made me know this guy was right for me?  He has steers!  Hahaha! No, they are not cows.  They are castrated males, so they are called steers (under the age of four - like the horse term "filly") and oxen (over the age of four - like the term "mare").  Sometimes I call them cows if they are being pains haha or we call them bulls sometimes, but they are not actually bulls (uncastrated - think of the term "stallion").

So, of course, I figured I might as well learn about this whole thing.  My guy used to show in 4-H growing up and then got into pulling about ten years ago.  The stick looks bad, but you don't hit them any harder than I would use a crop over a fence.  

The weirdest part for me was that you don't lead them.  You direct them with your voice and the goad stick.  And you don't use the goad stick like you would a lunging whip (the steers just roll their eyes at me, I swear).  While I have been a good student, there are definitely moments when I totally forget everything my honey has taught me and I revert to my horse brain.  So, I'd end up pointing the stick at their butts to make them go forward.  Ummm no.  

My first experience at showing at Ossipee Fair 2014.  This is Jack and Andy.  
I had no idea what I was doing.  We did a few classes that were essentially like in-hand classes.  Then we had to do this "working" class, which was pretty much like a trail class.

This is my honey pulling at Ossipee Fair 2014 with his other pair, Cain and Rebel.
He placed first that day!  That is my son with him.
Working them at home

Andy and Jack placed second at Cumberland Fair 2014
And then they placed second again a week later at Fryeburg Fair 2014.  This was a huge class of 19!
My son loving on Andy

I got my turn at pulling at Pine Tree in June 2015.  We tied for 3rd in the powder puff!  This is Jack and Andy.


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