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Hidden Brook Farm Dressage Schooling Show - June 2, 2019

Ellie and I did a show at our lesson barn this past weekend instead of taking a lesson.  I would have done a lesson on Saturday before the show, but my instructor went to NEDA Spring with her eldest daughter, who was able to get her last Grand Prix score for her USDF Gold Medal!!!  So that is a good reason to not be able to lesson haha.

I admit I was a little bummed about our low scores at the SMDA show two weeks prior.  I know a score of 6 (60%) is called satisfactory, but I really thought our performance was better than a low 60%.
I was determined to ride well and even though Beth was not there, I had her youngest daughter as my back up if the wheels fell off the bus LOL!  She was already in the warmup and at the show ring with her actual students, so it was nice to have her there to remind me to breathe and not hang on the left rein!  ;-)
Ellie unloaded and was totally calm.  Honestly, she loves her lesson barn and knows it is her second home haha.  She was much calmer tied to the tra…

Wait, are those.....COWS?!?!


To make a very long story short, I agreed to go out to dinner with an acquaintance and I cautiously agreed to date him...and the rest, as they say, is history!  LOL!  How's that for catching you all up on my love life hahahaha.

The great part about deciding to be with someone again is that you can be VERY PICKY.  I knew exactly what I wanted in any man I was going to be with from here on out.  High on the list was someone who respected the fact that I enjoy horses and having a farm.

One of the factors that made me know this guy was right for me?  He has steers!  Hahaha! No, they are not cows.  They are castrated males, so they are called steers (under the age of four - like the horse term "filly") and oxen (over the age of four - like the term "mare").  Sometimes I call them cows if they are being pains haha or we call them bulls sometimes, but they are not actually bulls (uncastrated - think of the term "stallion").

So, of course, I figured I might as well learn about this whole thing.  My guy used to show in 4-H growing up and then got into pulling about ten years ago.  The stick looks bad, but you don't hit them any harder than I would use a crop over a fence.  

The weirdest part for me was that you don't lead them.  You direct them with your voice and the goad stick.  And you don't use the goad stick like you would a lunging whip (the steers just roll their eyes at me, I swear).  While I have been a good student, there are definitely moments when I totally forget everything my honey has taught me and I revert to my horse brain.  So, I'd end up pointing the stick at their butts to make them go forward.  Ummm no.  

My first experience at showing at Ossipee Fair 2014.  This is Jack and Andy.  
I had no idea what I was doing.  We did a few classes that were essentially like in-hand classes.  Then we had to do this "working" class, which was pretty much like a trail class.

This is my honey pulling at Ossipee Fair 2014 with his other pair, Cain and Rebel.
He placed first that day!  That is my son with him.
Working them at home

Andy and Jack placed second at Cumberland Fair 2014
And then they placed second again a week later at Fryeburg Fair 2014.  This was a huge class of 19!
My son loving on Andy

I got my turn at pulling at Pine Tree in June 2015.  We tied for 3rd in the powder puff!  This is Jack and Andy.


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